Seven Points on Earth

Environmental history is a unique way of viewing the past. It includes examining human activity on farmland, nature’s effect on farm culture, ‘environmental sins,’ sustainable environments, ancient ways, and innovations. The “Seven Points on Earth” project takes a global perspective, considering how a new agriculture of fossil fuels, herbicides, crop specialization, and state intervention has impacted old, organic-based, Mennonite farm communities around the world. Specifically, the project considers the relationship between Mennonite farmers and the land in seven different communities: Apollonovka, Siberia; Matobo, Zimbabwe; Riva Palacios, Bolivia; Margorejo, Java; Friesland, the Netherlands; Kalona, Iowa; and Neubergthal, Manitoba.

Seven different communities; one faith trajectory.

 

Project Updates:

Seven Points on Earth: The Film

‘Seven Points on Earth’ is an hour-long documentary, recently completed in collaboration with the Chair in Mennonite Studies and the Centre for Transnational Mennonite Studies at the University of Winnipeg. It offers an unprecedented look at the diaspora of Mennonites living around the world.  The film explores the lives and history of Mennonite farmers in seven communities around the world: Apollonovka, Siberia; Matobo, Zimbabwe; Riva Palacios, Bolivia; Margorejo, Java; Friesland, the Netherlands; Kalona, Iowa; and Neubergthal, Manitoba.

The film premiered at the Winnipeg Real to Reel Film Festival in February 2017. You can view the trailer online here. The documentary is produced by filmmaker Paul Plett, Ode Productions. To order copies of the film, contact Paul at paul[at]ode-productions[dot]com